TIME Lightbox: Underwater Giants: The Magnificent Manta Rays of the Maldives

Swooping gracefully through the water like giant bats, these huge manta rays gather to feed on microscopic plankton. These amazing pictures were taken by British photographer Warren Baverstock, who spent nine days on the Maldives to capture these beautiful creatures. Up to 200 mantas gather in Hanifaru Bay, which is just the size of a football pitch, to feed and be cleaned of parasites by smaller fish.

Baverstock, 42, from Plymouth,  England, said, ”I slowly approached a three metre wide manta. I floated mesmerized by its graceful swimming pattern. Snapping out of my daze, I began to photograph the manta as it circled just under the surface whilst deeper down more mantas fed.” Baverstock, who works in the public aquarium industry and is based in the Middle East, added: ”Another manta ray glided alongside the small reef to be cleaned. Moments later two more arrived and as the density of plankton increased, so did the manta activity. Waiting patiently I peered down at the cleaning station, wondering what would happen next. I did not have to wait long and before I knew it, several mantas suddenly started to circle towards the surface, feeding on the soup of plankton all around me. The experience was incredible and as the the group synchronized so that they could all feed together, I watched with amazement as 25 large manta rays circled and barrel-rolled with mouths wide open less than a metre away from my camera. I had never felt so overwhelmed about such an amazing animal encounter.”

Manta rays are the world’s largest ray and have the biggest brain to body weight ratio of their cousins the skates and sharks. They feed on plankton and fish larvae either on the ocean floor or in open water. They filter their food from the water passing through their gills as they swim. Mantas frequently visit cleaning stations where small fish such as wrasse, remora, and angelfish swim in their gills.

Visit Page:

The Daily Mail: Open … wide: The astonishing gathering of manta rays to feast on plankton…

Swooping gracefully through the water like giant bats, these huge manta rays gather to feed on microscopic plankton. These amazing pictures were taken by British photographer Warren Baverstock who spent nine days on the Maldives to capture these beautiful creatures. Up to 200 mantas gather in Hanifaru Bay which is just the size of a football pitch to feed and be cleaned of parasites by smaller fish.

Mr Baverstock, 42, from Plymouth, Devon, said: ‘I slowly approached a 10ft-wide manta. I floated mesmerised by its graceful swimming pattern. ‘Snapping out of my daze, I began to photograph the manta as it circled just under the surface whilst deeper down more mantas fed.’

Mr Baverstock added: ‘Another manta ray glided alongside the small reef to be cleaned. ‘Moments later two more arrived and as the density of plankton increased, so did the manta activity. ‘Waiting patiently I peered down at the cleaning station, wondering what would happen next. ‘I did not have to wait long and before I knew it, several mantas suddenly started to circle towards the surface, feeding on the soup of plankton all around me. ‘The experience was incredible and as the the group synchronised so that they could all feed together, I watched with amazement as 25 large manta rays circled and barrel-rolled with mouths wide open less than a metre away from my camera.

I had never felt so overwhelmed about such an amazing animal encounter.’ Manta rays are the world’s largest ray and have the biggest brain to body weight ratio of their cousins the skates and sharks. They feed on plankton and fish larvae either on the ocean floor or in open water. They filter their food from the water passing through their gills as they swim. Mantas frequently visit cleaning stations where small fish such as wrasse, remora, and angelfish swim in their gills and over their skin to feed. This rids it of parasites and dead tissue. Their main predator are large sharks and very occasionally, killer whales.

Visit page..

Gallery Update: World Sea Turtle Day – 101 Hawksbill Turtles Release Event Photographs

Dubai, June 16 2011 – In celebration of World Sea Turtle Day, the Dubai Turtle Rehabilitation Project (DTRP) today successfully returned 101 critically endangered hawksbill turtles back to their natural habitat following several months of rehabilitation at Burj Al Arab and Madinat Jumeirah. 101 children, including competition winners, pupils from a local school and hotel guests, released the turtles from the beach of Madinat Jumeirah back into the Arabian Gulf. The DTRP is based at the Burj Al Arab and Madinat Jumeirah and run in conjunction with Dubai’s Wildlife Protection Office. It has been running since 2004 and has so far released over 500 rescued sea turtles back into Dubai’s waters. This year alone, over 350 sick or injured sea turtles have been treated by the DTRP’s team of marine biologists after washing up on the region’s beaches. The event, which attracted a large crowd with children’s activities and a taste of Jumeirah hospitality, was designed to raise awareness of the importance of the turtle rehabilitation programme, issues facing turtles, their risk of extinction (with an 87% decline in the hawksbill turtle population in the last three decades) and conservation of the marine environment.

Turtles will taste freedom Thursday – Plucky little creatures to be released into the wild after care by a local group

Rescued and rehabilitated hawksbill turtles are to be released back into the sea Thursday in celebration of World Sea Turtle Day.

One hundred turtles were released earlier this year for Earth Day, and this week another 101 turtles will be returned to the Arabian Gulf by the Dubai Turtle Rehabilitation Project (DTRP), a collaboration between the Wildlife Protection Office and the Burj Al Arab aquarium. Before their release the turtles are being kept in a new turtle pen at the Mina A’Salam hotel. Altogether 120 turtles brought back to health after being washed up ashore or handed in injured, are enjoying the specially built area. The 19 turtles not released today are expected to taste freedom after the summer when another release will be scheduled, said Warren Baverstock, Aquarium Operations Manager, Burj Al Arab. Article continues below Some of the turtles are positively buoyant, meaning they float on the surface and cannot control their movements well enough to be released and be expected to survive, he said. Fresh seawater is pumped into the pen daily and rocks have been placed in particular areas with an overhang to give the turtles somewhere to dive under, mimicking their natural environment.

Bigger space “The new enclosure opened in March. With the increased awareness we’ve been receiving more turtles and needed a bigger space,” said Baverstock. Around 360 turtles have been handed in so far this year, he added. The awareness programmes run by the DTRP include free lectures and daily feedings for the public including schools. Some turtles have been found with blood parasites and covered in barnacles, said Kevin Hyland from the Wildlife Protection Office. “Barnacles are not the cause of their problems, but rather are a symptom of what’s wrong with them. When they come in they’re anaemic, dehydrated, some even have pneumonia,” he said. Turtles that go through the DTRP are microchipped making it easy to track them if they wash up again. So far, none of the turtles released have returned, said David Robinson, Burj Al Arab assistant aquarium operations manager and member of the Dubai Turtle Rehabilitation Project team.

“The turtles are all yearlings from last year. We take DNA samples to try and track where they are coming from,” he said. Up to 430 turtle nests have been located near islands off the UAE coast, he added. “The turtles seem a bit disoriented when they are initially released but they never come back.”

Turtle feeding at Mina A’Salam takes place every Wednesday at 11.30am and Fridays at 1.30pm. To organise a school visit contact baaaquarium@jumeirah.com

http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/uae/environment/turtles-will-taste-freedom-thursday-1.822171

Warren Baverstock, Aquarium Manager im Burj Al Arab

Am 16. Juni, dem «World Turtle Day», wird die Jumeirah-Gruppe aus Dubai 101 Hawsbill-Schildkröten in die Freiheit entlassen. Ein rosser Tag für diese am meisten gefährdeten aller Meeresschildkröten – und für Warren Baverstock, den Aquarium Operation Manager.

Diese drei Arbeitsplätze sind Warren Baverstock ans Herz gewachsen: das Aquarium des Luxushotels Burj Al Arab in Dubai, das Aquarium des Restaurants Marina im Jumeirah Beach Hotel und das Dubai Turtle Rehabilitation Project in Mina A’Salam, Madinat Jumeirah, ebenfalls in Dubai. Baverstock ist verantwortlich

dafür, dass an diesen Riesenaquarien und im Schildkröten-Rehabilisierungszentrum nicht nur für das Wohl der Lebewesen gesorgt wird, sondern auch, dass sie nach neuesten Erkenntnissen geführt und ausgestattet

sind. Sein Arbeitstag ist denn auch spannend und ausgefüllt. Nach seiner Ankunft im weltbekannten Burj Al Arab macht er als Erstes einen Rundgang, kontrolliert sämtliche Einrichtungen und sieht nach den Tieren. Spezielle Beachtung finden dabei jene Tiere, die sich noch in Quarantäne befinden und in den nächsten  Tagen den Aquarien zugeführt werden sollen. Mit besonderer Hingabe und viel Energie kümmert er sich aber um sein Schildkröten-Rehabilisierungszentrum. Nach dem Kontrollgang bespricht er sich mit seinem Team. Es werden technische Aspekte, das Befinden der Tiere wie auch Projekte in Zusammenhang mit den Lebewesen diskutiert. Dabei ist vor allem das Wasser, ihre natürliche Umgebung, wichtig, das sich in einwandfreier Qualität zeigen soll.

Interview mit Monty Python – Baverstock erledigt administrative Arbeiten und beaufsichtigt die Fütterung der Tiere. So oft es geht, beobachtet er sie, um so auch weitere Erkenntnisse über sie zu sammeln. Und wenn immer es die Zeit zulässt, taucht er selber in die Aquarien ein und beteillgt sich an der Fütterung. So gesellt er sich besonders

gerne zu den Leopard-Haifischen, den Buckelkopf-Lippenfischen und den Moränen. Jeden Abend, bevor er nach Hause geht, macht er nochmals einen Kontrollgang. Ein unvergesslicher Arbeitstag war jener,

als er vom englischen Komödianten und Reisejournalisten Michael Palin im Burj al Arab interviewt wurde. Er werde nie vergessen, wie sie sich das erste Mal begegnet seien: «Michael, I’m a big fan», habe er zu Palin gesagt. Und dieser habe sein «Monty Python face» aufgesetzt und erwidert: «Yes, you are!» – bezugnehmend auf den Grössenunterschied der beiden. Palin ist 177 Zentimeter gross, Baverstock 198 Zentimeter. Die Liebe zum Wasser und seinen Lebewesen übernahm er von seinem Vater. Dieser habe ihn schon als Bub ins Moorland bei Devon in Grossbritannien mitgenommen. Und seit er zu einem Geburtstag einen Schnorchel

und eine Maske bekommen habe, sei es sein Bubentraum gewesen, später einmal den Leuten über Wasser zeigen zu können, was es unter Wasser so alles zu entdecken gibt. Als er dann auch Tauchen lernte, war klar: Die Wasserwelt war seine. Seine Arbeit in Dubai fasziniert ihn. In den nächsten drei Jahren will er zahlreiche Renovationen und Verbesserungen vornehmen und sich noch weiter für das childkrötenzentrum

einsetzen. In diesem Rehabilisationszentrum werden Schildkröten, die verletzt oder ausgestossen wurden, wieder aufgepäppelt und wenn immer möglich wieder in die Freiheit entlassen. Baverstock wird auch verantwortlich sein für das Schildkrötenprojekt, das die Jumeirah-Gruppe in ihrem neuen Hotel auf den Malediven umsetzen will. Wie viel ihm diese Tiere bedeuten, unterstreicht er mit seinen Aktivitäten im Rehabilisierungsprogramm, das auf den beiden Internetseiten http://www.facebook.com/turtle.rehabilitation und

http://www.dubaiturtles.com dokumentiert ist. Gibt es etwas, das er an seiner Arbeit nicht liebt? «Nein, eigentlich nicht – ausser dass ich gerne Verstärkung bei den administrativen Aufgaben hätte. Ich bin nicht unbedingt

ein Büromensch.» In seiner Freizeit widmet sich Warren Baverstock der Unterwasserfotografie. Er möchte in Dubai eine Gemeinschaft von Unterwasserfotografen aufbauen. Seit zehn Jahren wohnt er nunmehr in Dubai. Das Einzige, das er vermisse, seien Flüsse und Bäche, umgeben von grünem Gras und saftigen Bäumen. Dabei geniesst er wiederum das Leben in Dubai mit seinen ganz anderen Schönheiten.

EIN TAG IM LEBEN – Von Emil Hager

British Underwater Image Festival 2011 – 1st and 2nd Place

This year’s British Underwater Image Festival attracted hundreds of entries across all of the categories, showcasing the very best in underwater photography and filmmaking.

Now in its sixth year, BUIF is the biggest competition of its kind in the UK. It comprises two sections – the video category is judged by BAFTA-winning cameraman Peter Scoones and the stills section is judged by DIVE regulars Alex Mustard and Charles Hood. Joining them on both judging panels were DIVE editor Simon Rogerson and Colin Does, founder of the British Society of Underwater Photographers. The awards were presented at a ceremony held at the Big Scuba Show in London’s Olympia, where 50 of the best photographs were on display. The winning DVDs were shown in a dedicated film theatre.

Stills section
If previous years have seen marked trends popping up in the stills category, this year’s entries were notable for their variety. There were plenty of entries depicting scenes from Hanifaru, site of a newly-discovered manta ray aggregation in the Maldives, but for the most part the entries were of varied subject material – everything from toads to humpback whales. In the Suunto Open Section, the judges were unanimous in their praise of Simon Brown’s intricately lit photograph of  Royal Navy clearance divers staging a mock underwater fight. The photo is obviously a set-up [in fact, it was staged to make a Christmas card for the team], but the precision of its lighting and the subtlety of the composition create a dramatic image. Interestingly, Simon’s photograph was taken using remote flashes, currently a fashionable technique among underwater photographers, and used here to compelling effect.

There was a glut of excellent entries in the Apex British Section. The judges were torn between some quality work, but eventually gave first place to Keith Lyall’s atmospheric diver shot from the wreck of the James Eagan Layne in Whitsand Bay, Cornwall. The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer category is for users of compact cameras, and was dominated this year by a hard-working British photographer, Dan Bolt. He took first place with a striking silhouette shot of a diver taken in a river, while his super sharp seal photo took second place in the same category.

The judges had tougher time going over the Fourth Element Portfolio section, which is open to many different interpretations and can generate entries that are hard to compare. In the end, Warren Baverstock’s manta rays from Hanifaru won everyone’s admiration and first place.

www.divemagazine.co.uk/photography/buif/5445-all-the-winners-from-buif-2011.html

Whale Shark Photographs Support Dr Ralph Sonntag (IFAW) Article In German Dive Magazine – “tauchen”

Eine Begegnung mit dem größten Fisch der Welt zählt zu den absoulten Highlights eines Sporttaucherlebens. Ein Erlebniss, das noch monatelang glücklich macht und immer wieder in kleinen Schüben Adrenalin freisetzt. Die friedlichen Giganten sind beliebt, aber eigentlich wissen wir so gut wie nichts über sie. Um mehr über den Walhai zu erfahren, und um ihn insbesondere im Indischen Ozean besser schützen zu können, wurde das Projekt „Sharkquest Arabia“ mit starker Unterstützung durch den IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare) und einigen anderen Organisationen ins Leben gerufen. Neben einer wissenschaftlichen Konferenz über die Walhaie im nördlichen Indischen Ozean (siehe Kasten unten) sind wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen und ein Filmprojekt über Walhaie und Haie in Arbeit. Das Filmprojekt soll in erster Linie dazu dienen, die arabische Bevölkerung der Region über die Schätze ihrer Ozeane aufzuklären und einen größeren Rückhalt in der Bevölkerung für den Haischutz zu bekommen. Immerhin gehören die arabischen Emirate zu den größten Umschlagplätzen für Haifischflossen die nach Asien gehen. Eines der wenigen Meeresgebiete, wo man von Oktober bis Ende Januar praktisch eine Walhaigarantie hat, ist der Golf von Tadjoura in Dschibuti. Auch wenn dort fast ausschließlich junge, relativ kleine Walhaie auftauchen, kann man hier schon das majestätische und elegante dieser Fische aus nächster Nähe miterleben. Ihre schiere Größe beeindruckt jeden. In der Literatur schwanken die Größenangaben, oft liest man von 15 Meter Maximallänge, in der wissenschaftlichen Literatur gibt es jedoch nachweislich Tiere bis 18 Meter, es wird sogar von einem 20 Meter langen Tier berichtet, das in Taiwan angelandet wurde.

Dies ist auch die theoretisch errechnete Maximallänge dieser Tiere, denn Walhaie wachsen ihr Leben lang und man vermutet, dass sie etwa 160 Jahre alt werden können. Leider werden sie aber selten so groß, weil sie vorher weggefangen wurden oder anderen negativen Umwelteinflüssen erliegen. Ähnlich wie die meisten Großwale, Mantas oder den entfernten Verwandten Riesenund Großmaulhaien ist auch der Walhai ein Planktonfresser, nur so können diese Riesentiere ihren Energiebedarf decken. Dafür nutzt er ein schwammiges Gewebe vor seinen Kiemenspalten, in dem das Plankton hängenbleibt und runtergeschluckt werden kann. Im Gegensatz zum Riesenhai saugt er das Wasser jedoch aktiv ein, manchmal hängt er hierfür vertikal unter der Wasseroberfläche und man hat den Eindruck, dass er Hektoliter für Hektoliter des planktonreichen Oberflächenwassers durchpumpt. Man spricht vom “vertical feeding“. Unklar ist warum er trotzdem wie die meisten Haie mehrere Zahnreihen im Kiefer hat. Diese Zähne sind zwar nur wenige Milimeter groß und fallen in dem Riesenmaul des Hais überhaupt nicht auf, aber sie sind da und keiner weiß warum. Genauso wenig ist über den Speiseplan des Giganten bekannt. Offensichtlich ist, dass Plankton zu seinen Lieblingsspeisen zählt. Er taucht regelmäßig in Gebieten auf, wo Korallen gerade ihre Eier in großen Massen abgeben. Unter Wissenschaftlern wird allerdings diskutiert, ob er ähnlich wie Wale auch Fischschwärme angeht. Taucher haben in jedem Fall nichts zu befürchten, die Speiseröhre ist viel zu klein, als das ein Mensch da durch passt. Bis vor kurzem war auch das Liebesleben der Walhaie noch ein Geheimnis. Da man ein einzelnes Ei gefunden hatte und auch bei schwangeren Weibchen bis vor kurzem nur Eier nachweisen konnte, vermutete man, dass er wie seine nächsten Verwandten die Ammenhaie eierlegend ist. Inzwischen weiß man, dass er mit circa 20 Jahren und etwa acht bis neun Meter Länge fortpflanzungsfähig ist und lebende Junge zur Welt bringt. Sie sind bei der Geburt bereits 80 Zentimeter lang. Bei einem gefangenen Tier hat man bis zu 300 Embryos in unterschiedlichen Entwicklungsstadien gefunden. Er gehört damit zu den ovoviviparen Haien, die Eier produzieren und sie im Mutterleib ausbrüten. Es werden dann vollständig entwickelte Junghaie geboren.

Leider konnten bisher weder Paarungen noch Geburten beobachtet werden. Dadurch ist bisher auch unbekannt, ob es spezielle Paarungsgebiete oder Kinderstuben gibt. Die jungen Walhaie scheinen direkt nach der Geburt zu verschwinden und werden dann erst wieder in Größen von drei bis vier Meter beobachtet. Beispielsweise werden die Gewässer im Golf von Tadjoura in Dschibuti fast ausschließlich von jungen Männchen um die vier Meter Länge besucht. Sie tauchen im Spätherbst auf und verschwinden Ende Januar wieder. Trotz großer Anstrengungen mit Photo-ID-Bildern konnte bisher keiner der individuell registrierten Walhaie von Dschibuti irgendwo anders widergefunden werden. Dasselbe gilt für Tiere die in Mosambik, den Seychellen oder anderen Gebieten fotografiert wurden. Das Identifizieren der Haie ist möglich, da sie eine individuell einzigartige Zeichnung von Punkten und Strichen auf ihrer Oberseite tragen. Zur Photo-ID werden bevorzugt Bilder aus dem Schulterbereich verwendet. Offensichtlich ist aber der Datenbestand aus mehreren hundert Bildern noch nicht groß genug, darum rufen Wissenschaftler Sporttaucher weltweit auf ihre Fotos von Walhaien bei http://www.whaleshark.org einzusenden.

Man weiß zwar durch Besenderungen der Tiere, dass Walhaie lange Wanderungen durchführen, beispielsweise konnte im Pazifik ein Walhai entlang eine Strecke von 13000 Kilometer über 37 Monate verfolgt werden. Man weiß allerdings nicht, ob es sich hier um regelmäßige Wanderungen wie sie beispielsweise Wale ausführen handelt. Hier können hoffentlich irgendwann die individuellen Bilder aus einem umfangreichen Walhaikatalog helfen. Bisher konnte man einige Walhai-Hotspots identifizieren: beispielsweise tummeln sich in Dschibuti die Walhaie von Oktober bis Januar. Ein anderer guter Platz ist Tofo in Mosambik wo es praktisch von November bis April Walhaigarantie gibt. Auf den Seychellen oder im australischen Ningalooriff werden die großen Haie mit Leichtflugzeugen gesucht, um dann die Schnorchler dorthin zu bringen. Insbesondere in Australien sind die Plätze limitiert, das heißt man muss sich rechtzeitig für eine Walhai-Schnorchel- Tour anmelden.

An anderen Orten der Welt, wie auf den Malediven oder vor Kenia, sieht man zwar regelmäßig Walhaie, allerdings ohne Garantie. Zusätzlich zu den individuellen Bildern versucht man auch, von möglichst vielen Haien Gewebeproben zu bekommen. Mit Hilfe von DNA-Analysen kann man feststellen wie nahe die einzelnen Walhaigruppen miteinander verwandt sind, ob es einen regelmäßigen genetischen Austausch gibt, das bedutet ob sie sich untereinander paaren oder voneinander isoliert leben. Man kann dadurch auch feststellen, ob es möglicherweise besonders gefährdete Populationen, oder Unterarten oder sogar getrennte Arten gibt. Dafür gibt es bisher allerdings noch keine Hinweise. Mit Hilfe dieser Methode wurde vor kurzer Zeit erwiesen, dass es nicht nur eine Schwertwalart gibt, sondern sogar drei unterschiedliche, die sich äußerlich sehr ähneln aber genetisch weiter voneinander entfernt sind als Schimpansen und Gorillas. Es gibt keinerlei Informationen über Bestandszahlen der Walhaie oder deren Entwicklung, es gibt allenfalls anekdotische Informationen: Hai-Sichtungen vor der thailändischen Küste sind zum Beispiel weniger geworden, ebenso wie die Größe der gefundenen Tiere. Ein Hinweis, dass der Bestand dort rücklaÅNufig ist und das obwohl sie in Thailand kaum gejagt werden. In Indien wurde die großen Haie bis 2001 verfolgt. Walhaie werden wegen ihres wohlschmeckenden Fleisches, dem Öl, dass zur Abdichtung von Booten verwendet wird und wegen ihren großen Flossen gefangen. Glücklicherweise hat hier in den letzten zehn Jahren ein Umdenken begonnen und sie wurden in zahlreichen Ländern unter Schutz gestellt. International wurde 2002 der Handel mit Walhai-Produkten durch eine Listung auf Anhang 2 des Washingtoner Artenschutzabkommens stark eingeschränkt.